Category Archives: > College Level and Beyond

Information of interest to adults, advanced and post-high school students

Keep Up With Homework: Tips

for Orton Gillingham tutoring in Columbus OH, see below

At Understood.org, Amanda Morin makes these four suggestions (I’ve added a comment or two):

1] Catalog by Class: students can use different colored binders/folders for each separate class. Make headers on papers showing topic and date. Utilize file pockets; identify which pockets will keep ‘pages to be dealt with,’ ‘pages to hand in,’ ‘pages to be filed into a binder/folder.’

2] Have one dedicated space at home where student stores school materials: it’s difficult to stay organized if notebooks, notes, textbooks and writing utensils are scattered through the house.  Have a dedicated desk if possible, but if not, a shelf or cabinet where these can always be found.

3] Create a system for study materials: the system might be as simple as a shoebox filled with paper, pencils, highlighters, staplers, clips, scissors. After finishing work, you or your student restocks the supplies and sharpens pencils for next time. A lot of time is wasted searching for these things.

4] Type up class notes: if a student types notes, they are easier to read. But typing them also helps build memory.  In addition, if he emails them to himself he’s got them at school in case he forgets to bring them to class. Or: use a cloud service (e.g. Google Drive or Dropbox) to access school documents from anywhere with an Internet connection!

source: https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/learning-at-home/homework-study-skills/at-a-glance-4-strategies-for-keeping-up-with-studying?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=understoodorg

Amanda Morin is a parent advocate and former teacher, and the author of The Everything Parent’s Guide to Special Education.

Orton-Gillingham tutoring in Columbus OH: Adrienne Edwards 614-579-6021 (call or text).  Or Email: aedwardstutor@columbus.rr.com.

+ Summer School Tips from eNotes.com

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Here is a Web site — eNotes — for students and teachers: www.enotes.com.

eNotes offers study guides, discussion rooms and tutoring help.  If you sign up, they will send you useful emails. You can also follow eNotes on Facebook.

A recent email newsletter offers tips for surviving summer school.

  • Attend class — well, obviously.  But it’s especially important in the context of summer school, since classes progress much faster than during the regular school year.  Missing just one lesson can leave you substantially behind.
  • Read a little more each day — since these classes whiz by, the amount you have to learn is condensed into a shorter time frame.  So spend a little extra time studying every day.
  • Think positive — especially if you’re repeating a class, don’t be dejected.  You’re at an advantage, since you’ve got old class notes to review as well.  Info will sink in faster.  If you’re not repeating a class, remind yourself that you’ll be a step ahead when school begins in the fall.
  • Stay energized — summer can sap your energy, as will late nights.  Three hour classes are common.  So it’s very important to keep decent hours, eat right, get some exercise.
  • Don’t suffer in silence — voice your questions to the instructor, confirm information with your peers.  Go to eNotes as well for help.  If you’re writing an essay, eNotes offers an Essay Lab.

Check out eNotes.  Lots of material is freely available.  For a six month or a year’s subscription you will find  a depth of resource material at your fingertips.  Cool benefit —  every month in 2012 eNotes is giving away a Kindle Fire.

Find eNotes on Facebook to enter: http://www.facebook.com/enotes .  Just “like” them and then answer this question:  “In the spirit of July 4th, what book embodies the “great American novel” in your opinion, and why?

Orton-Gillingham tutoring in Columbus OH:  Adrienne Edwards 614-579-6021 or email aedwardstutor@columbus.rr.com 

+ Linguists Say Girls are Pioneering Vocal Trends

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Douglas Quenqua in the NY Times reports that linguists are far from calling the “Valley Girl” trend called uptalk and the use of “like” in sentences as markers of immaturity and stupidity.

They are now explaining that young women use these embellishments in much more sophisticated ways than people realize.

Says Penny Eckert, professor of linguisitcs at Stanford

A lot of these really flamboyant things you hear are cute, and girls are supposed to be cute.  But they’re not just using them because they’re girls.  They’re using them to achieve some kind of interactional and stylistic end.

In December, researchers from Long Island University published a paper in The Journal of Voice.  From an admittedly very small sample — recorded speech from 34 women ages 18 to 25 — they found evidence of a new trend among female college students: a gutteral fluttering of the vocal cords they have called “vocal fry.”

Vocal fry is best described as a raspy or croaking sound injected (usually) at the end of a stentence.  Says Quenqua, it can be heard when Mae West says “Why don’t you come up and see me sometime;” or when Maya Rudolph on Saturday Night Live imitates Maya Angelou.

Nassima Abdelli-Beruh, a speech scientist at Long Island University, says we shouldn’t scoff.  “They use this as a tool to convey something.  You quickly realize that for them it is as a cue.”

And another linguist, Carmen Fought, professor at Pitzer College, says “If women do something like uptalk or vocal fry, it’s immediately interpreted as insecure, emotional or even stupid.  The truth is this: Young women take linguistic features and use them as power tools for building relationships.”

“It’s generally pretty well known that if you identify a sound change in progress, then young people will be leading old people, and women tend to be maybe half a generation ahead of males on average,” according to Mark Liberman, linguist at the University of Pennsylvania.

Why Women?

Some linguists suggest that women are more sensitive to social interactions and hence more likely to adopt subtle social cues.  Others feel women use language to assert their power in a culture that has asked them — in days gone by — to be sedate and decorous.  A third theory is that young women are simply given more leeway by society to speak flamboyantly.

“Uptalk”

It is well established that female vocal fads eventually make their way into the general vernacular.  Starting in the 1980s in America (after possibly emigrating from Australia), “uptalk” was common among Valley Girls. 

In the past 20 years, uptalk has traveled up the age range and across the gender boundary, according to David Crystal, a longtime professor of linguistics at Bangor University in Wales.  “I’ve heard grandfathers and grandmothers use it.  I occasionally use it myself.” 

The same can be said for the word “like,” when used in a grammatically superfluous way, or to add cadence to a sentence.  It has found its way into Webster’s New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition, which explains that people use ” like” in a sentence “apparently without meaning or sytactic function, but possibly as emphasis.”

“Like” and uptalk often go hand in hand. There are studies that show uptalk can be used for many purposes, and sometimes to dominate a listener.

Cynthia McLemore, linguist at Penn, found that senior members of a Texas sorority used uptalk to make junior members feel obligated to carry out new tasks. (“We have a rush event this Thursday?  And everyone needs to be there?”)

Vocal fry, also known as “creaky voice,” has some history.  Dr Crystal cited it as far back as 1964, when he noticed it was a way for British men to denote their superior social standing.

In the United States it has been gaining popularity since 2003, when Dr. Fought detected it among the female speakers of a Chicano dialect in California.

Actresses like Gwyneth Paltrow and Reese Witherspoon have used creaky voice when portraying contemporary American characters (“Shallow Hal,” “Legally Blonde”). 

What does it denote? Ikuko Patricia Yuasa, lecturer in linguistics at UC Berkeley, calls it a natural result of a woman lowering her voice to sound more authoritative.

But it can also be used to indicate disinterest, which teenage girls are fond of doing.

According to Dr. Liberman,

It’s a mode of vibration that happens when the vocal cords are relatively lax, when subvocal pressure is low.  So maybe some people use it when they’re relaxed and even bored, not especially aroused or invested in what they are saying.

Dr Eckert says that language changes very fast, however.  Most people — particularly adults — will almost surely make mistakes when they try to divine the meaning of new forms of language used by young women.

“What may sound excessively ‘girly’ to me may sound smart, authoritative and strong to my students.”

For Douglas Quenqua’s article: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/28/science/young-women-often-trendsetters-in-vocal-patterns.html?_r=1&ref=science

Note: Every Tuesday the NY Times has a Science Times insert, chock full of great reports from the world of research as well as little known facts to intrigue any student!

Orton-Gillingham tutoring in Columbus OH:  Adrienne Edwards 614-579-6021 or email aedwardstutor@columbus.rr.com.

+ Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) Offers Online Courses

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Learn about modern art in a contemporary way.  MOMA’s registration is now open for Winter 2012 courses.  Courses begin February 27.

Enrich yourself and your understanding of art. 

MOMA Courses Online invite newcomers and experienced art lovers alike.  Explore modern art in your home and on your schedule.  You will have the same instructors who teach in the MOMA’s classrooms and galleries.

Discover the fascinating stories and ideas behind some of the masterpieces in MOMA’s collection.  You’ll use a rich variety of multimedia materials, including narrated slide shows, course texts, images, and engaging, exclusive videos shot on location in the Museum’s galleries.

TWO FORMATS

Instructor-Led (courses begin February 27) — For eight or 10 weeks, enjoy exclusive access to richly detailed videos, slide shos, audio and readings, plus discussion forums that allow you to interact with an instructor and peers.  $350; $300 for educators, students, seniors, other museum staff, and members. 

Self-guided (now available) — A more independent learning experience offering the same content as the instructor-led courses, without discussion forums or teacher guidance through the materials.  $200; $175 for educators, students, seniors, other museum staff, and members.

TOPICS

  • Materials and Techniques of Postwar Abstract Painter
  • Modern Art 1880-1945
  • Experiment With Collage
  • Modern and Contemporary Art: 1945-1898

Visit http://www.moma.org/learn/courses/index

Orton-Gillingham tutoring in Columbus OH:  Adrienne Edwards 614-579-6021  or email aedwardstutor@columbus.rr.com

+ New: Free MA in Education at American Museum of Natural History

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An article in the NY Times explains that the American Museum of Natural History will introduce its first Master of Arts in teaching program. 

According to Douglas Quenqua, they are looking for a small group of science majors, no teaching experience needed, to spend 15 months learning to become science teachers.

Tuition is free, thanks to the New York State Board of Regents.  Students will receive $30,000 stipends and health benefits.

President of the museum Ellen V. Futter says “We’re looking for people who want to make a career of teaching and stay in the business, whether they be just out of college or former participants in a volunteer corps or career changers or veterans.”

The program aims to produce 50 new science teachers over two years for the state’s middle and high schools, which are coping with a critical shortage of math and science instructors.

The catch is that graduates must commit to spending four years teaching in a high-needs public school; they may be assigned anywhere in New York State.

At an open house which drew about 90 people, the museum had an opportunity to pitch the program.  They also had to sell the concept of museum-as-classroom.

Question and answer sessions were held in the Astor Turret, a cylindrical, high-ceiling room that overlooks Central Park West.  Then Rosamund Kinzler, director of science education at the museum, led participants through the gem and minerals collection.

“The courses will be graduate-level science courses,” said Kinzler, “but they’ll be taught specifically with an eye toward preparing individuals to teach science in the classroom.”

Students will study and eventually teach planets and their orbits, water and weather, and basic geology.  The physical environment of New York — including Central Park across the street — will also play an important role in the courses.

Andrea Lewis, principal of Murry Bergstraum High School for Business and Careers in Manhattan, is happy about the program. 

She says “I’m looking to find teachers who can bring the exterior world into the classroom, take their kids outside the building, to really learn how to analyze, and hopefully get involved wtih science because of the experience they’ve had.”

For the entire article, visit http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/16/nyregion/american-museum-of-natural-history-will-groom-school-teachers.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=Douglas%20Quenqua&st=cse

Orton-Gillingham tutoring in Columbus OH:  Adrienne Edwards, 614-579-6021 or email aedwardstutor@columbus.rr.com.

+ Study Tips from enotes.com

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From eNotes, study tips. 

Read the syllabus!  Knowing when assignments are due is the primary reason you want to refer to your syllabus early and often.  But there are other reasons as well.

  • Attendance: Attendance policies can vary widely, especially in college courses.  But most professors will assess penalties for missed classes.  Make sure you know how many classes — if any — you can miss before your grade is affected.
  • Late Work: Accepting late work is typically at the discretion of your teacher.  Some won’t accept late work, period.  Others may have substantial penalties associated with accepting late assignments.  Be sure you know where each instructor stands.
  • Extra Credit:  Again — each instructor is different.  Some teachers offer modest “extra credit” points.  Some may increase your grade a great deal for putting in extra effort.  Others may not offer extra credit at all.
  • Contacting Your Instructor: Most professors and teachers will list their office phone numbers (and even sometimes a personal number) as well as their email address.  Most will also tell you their preferred method of contact.  Use the method they prefer first.

About this resource:   eNotes is a web site for students and teachers, with resources and study guides, teachers who will answer questions and lots more.  There is even a Facebook app.  Subscribe for a short period, or for a year.  Check it out.

http://www.enotes.com

Orton-gillingham tutoring in Columbus OH:  Adrienne Edwards 614-579-6021  or email aedwardstutor@columbus.rr.com

+ Orton-Gillingham Tutor Training in Akron OH

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The Children’s Dyslexia Center of Akron provides evaluation and one-on-one instruction for children with dyslexia and other reading difficulties.

It also offers training, continuing education and resources for teachers, schools and individuals in the Orton-Gillingham approach used to remediate dyslexia.

Volunteers to be considered for acceptance in the O-G training program (to begin in January) must have a bachelor’s degree in any field.  Requirements include 45 hours of classroom seminar and 100 hours of practicum, which trainees will complete by tutoring two students at the Center.

The trainings are sponsored and overseen by the 32nd Degree Masons, who have Orton-Gillingham tutoring centers all throughout the country.  We are lucky to have one in Columbus as well.

For over ten years, the Scottish Rite Masons, Northern Jurisdiction, have been national leaders in the effort to help children and their families overcome the painful obstacles of dyslexia. At 59 Learning Centers in 15 states, the Children’s Learning Centers tackle the challenge of dyslexia head-on, both by providing free tutoring for children with dyslexia and by training a growing cadre of highly skilled and dedicated tutors.

Contact Heather Petruccelli or Laura Arnold at 330-664-0777, or akronlc@yahoo.com . The address is 150 Springside Drive, Suite B-235, Akron OH 44333.

Orton-Gillingham tutoring in Columbus OH:  Adrienne Edwards  614-579-6021 or email aedwardstutor@columbus.rr.com